Books of the Month: June 2020

Wow, SIX months of reading and I am SO close to my goal for the entire YEAR (My goal was 30 books total and I’m already at 28). I did not think I read as much this month, as I was taking 2 online courses that were job related but I guess I did read 5 books which is still on par. I cheated though, some of these were very quick reads! I am proud of all I accomplished this month in my life, since I stopped using social media for the month.

Godshot was a very heavy book that took me longer than expected to finish; set in a small California town going through a drought, this book details the coming of age story of Lacey May. It deals with a religious cult leader, female friendships, family and motherhood.

The Guest List was a classic ‘Who Done It’ murder involving a wedding party and the guests during a wedding set on an eerie island in off the coast Ireland. Interesting read, but I wouldn’t rush out to buy it.

The Two Lives of Lydia Bird was a sweet book; Josie Silver stole my heart with One Day in December, and this one was no different. Lydia’s fiance, Freddie, dies in a freak accident and while she grieves his death, she finds a parallel life in her sleep where Freddie is still alive. A good option if you need a quick feel good.

Normal People was…okay? I’m not sure why there is so much hype around this book. It was good, but definitely not my favorite. No one in my book club liked it either, so I would say to pass on this if you’ve been thinking about it (I’m going to watch the Hulu show, I’ll keep you posted how it compares).

The Garden of Small Beginnings was a favorite. Years after Lili’s husband suddenly passes, she is starting to feel a sense of normalcy with her two kids, but she has to attend a gardening class for her job and everything turns upside down. There are also gardening tips throughout the book in between chapters, which are so cute. If you haven’t read Abbi Waxman (I also read Bookish Life of Nina Hill in April), I would really recommend!

Godshot: A Novel by Chelsea Bieker
The Guest List by Lucy Foley
Normal People by Sally Rooney
Overall for this month, I would recommend that you read The Garden of Small Beginnings, without a doubt, but if you can handle a heavier topic book, check out Godshot as well!
Next month, I’m planning to read The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo and The Last Flight by Julie Clark. Feel free to join me reading either if you can, would love to hear your thoughts!
Sincerely,
Sara Ann
*I have linked all books through a local LA bookstore, Eso Won Books, that is black and veteran owned. I believe they ship nationwide, but I would encourage you to research black owned bookstores in your area to purchase

Books of the Month: May 2020

Another month stuck in the Q, another 5 books read. I can hardly believe we’ve been social distancing this long and frankly, still alive and possibly thriving on some levels. I mean, I’ve read 14 books since the start, and that’s pretty awesome if you ask me!

Untamed was incredible, I want so many quotes tattooed directly on my face. I also want her to write a whole book on religion, as well as white women + racism (not by herself, of course, but with activists of color who can help shape the conversation); I think it’s important to discuss and be aware of as many white women dance around the conversation as well as the importance of it, especially in today’s climate. I’m also low key obsessed with Glennon and Abby’s relationship, like where is the Lifetime movie of their romance?! I encourage everyone to read it!

One True Loves was another good page turner/romance book. Basically, the main woman’s husband dies, she grieves and then finds love again + gets engaged, only to find out her husband has been lost at sea and is coming home. I was very torn on who I wanted her to end up with, but it had a wonderful ending, tied neatly with a bow; would recommend for a quick read! Valentine was a book set in the 70’s in West Texas, about a young Mexican girl who is raped by a white young man and of course, everyone in the town blames her for being a slut and ruining his life (EYE ROLL). It was slow and hard to get through at times, I don’t regret reading it, but I don’t think I would tell you to add to your list?

The Bride Test was another great story from Helen Hoang, about an autistic main character, who struggles to make a connection. Would recommend as a quick read/feel good! Finally, Big Summer was a murder mystery that was a little cliche at times and I felt bored in some places; I’m sad because I was really looking forward to this one as a Jennifer Weiner fan. I think this was the author’s first time delving into mysteries? It was not terribly thrilling, but highlighted friendship and body image, especially plus size acceptance in our society. I would maybe recommend if you’re a Jennifer Weiner fan, but even then, not exactly worth it.

If I had to recommend one, it would be Untamed. If you’re not into memoirs/self help, would go for One True Loves or Bride Test

Untamed by Glennon Doyle Melton
One True Loves: A Novel by Taylor Jenkins Reid
Valentine: A Novel by Elizabeth Wetmore
The Bride Test by Helen Hoang
Big Summer: A Novel by Jennifer Weiner
Any reading suggestions for me? Let me know in the comments, I need some new ideas! I’m reading Godshot next…
Sincerely,
Sara Ann

Books of the Month: April 2020

I cannot be tamed! I have been flying through books, you guys, bringing my year total to 18? 19? Who knows.  I would like to thank COVID for allowing me this time at home with nothing else to do that would prevent me from reading. But in all seriousness, I have become obsessed with reading. In the last month, I’ve bought 6 books, which is the most I’ve bought in years! I also read 6 books, which is kind of insane! See my April reads recap below.

Mrs. Everything was about the lives of two sisters, from childhood to seniorhood; it touched on the expectations placed on women, LBGTQ+ rights and family relationships. It was fascinating to read about the lives of these two women and how their attitudes and ideals morphed over decades of time, neither ending up where I thought they would. The Queen’s Fortune was a book club choice and I’m mad I waited so long to read it. It’s a historical fiction novel about Napoleon’s first fianceé, Desiree Clary, and her life, woven into Napoleon’s triumphs and surviving France during the revolution.

The Bookish Life of Nina Hill was such a wonderful way to escape during these crazy times. Set in Larchmont, a neighborhood in LA, you’ll read about a millenial named Nina and her love of books. It deals with handling anxiety and putting yourself out there to try all kinds of new relationships. Before We Were Strangers was a classic love story, boy meets girl, they fall in love in college but fall apart afterward, re-connecting 15 years later through a Craigslist ‘Missed Connection’ ad. I finished in about 2 days, it was a very easy read, plus it was only $2.99 on Kindle. I read apart of Readheads Book Club (would recommend this podcast!)

Kiss Quotient was a (very) steamy read, but the main couple had great chemistry. I loved that the main character had autism and a lot of the story showcased her struggle of wanting to connect with someone romantically but not being able to connect in the usual socially acceptable ways. Dear Edward was a coming of age story about a young boy in a plane crash with his family, where he is the sole survivor. The chapters go back and forth between the events that happen on the plane and Edward’s life post crash, and his learning to live with the tragedy. Talk about needing tissues!

I was very into feel-good love stories this month; I think because during these crazy times, we all need a feel-good, pick-me-up, and these books provided that for the most part. If I could only read one, I would read (and this is very hard because these books were so good) The Queen’s Fortune, mostly because I learned things while reading it so I felt like I was multi-tasking. If you need a feel good page turner to lighten your mood, please read Before We Were Strangers or The Kiss Quotient; neither will disappoint.

Mrs. Everything: A Novel by Jennifer Weiner
The Bookish Life of Nina Hill by Abbi Waxman
Before We Were Strangers: A Love Story by Renée Carlino
The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang
Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano
The Queen’s Fortune: A Novel of Desiree, Napoleon, and the Dynasty That Outlasted the Empire by Allison Pataki

I can’t decide whether to start Untamed by Glennon Doyle Melton or Valentine by Elizabeth Wetmore next. Here’s to May reading and hopefully being allowed to leave my apartment a bit more!

Sincerely,

Sara Ann

BOOKS OF THE MONTH: March 2020

Can I just say, since the start of the year, I’ve already read 14 books. I’m really proud of myself for sticking to my goals for the year, and I really feel like I’m expanding my reading horizons. Let’s also be honest in that I wouldn’t have read nearly as many books if it were not for a global pandemic forcing me to remain indoors all the time.

Bad Blood was absolutely insane. I knew the name, Elizabeth Holmes, but I had no idea what the story of her company truly was. I would highly recommend this book, there will be moments when my jaw was on the floor and I couldn’t fathom that these things actually HAPPENED. Like I don’t think the best fictional writers of our generation could write the things that went down at Theranos. I did find some parts slow (I started in January), just because I don’t understand medicine or blood testing, but for the most part, it was engaging and they simplified most things where they could.

The Ship of Brides was a cute romcom with side notes of female friendship as well as the expectation of women’s behavior in the 50’s (which was very infuriating). I loved how it started in the present and went back to World War II. Would read on the beach. Dear Girls was cute and funny, but definitely tame by Ali Wong’s standards. I loved that she wrote it for her daughters and I especially loved the afterward her husband wrote (also a letter to their daughters). Overall, would listen to this on audiobook if given the chance again, but would really recommend, especially if you’re an Ali Wong fan or enjoy celeb autobiographies!

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo was fantastic, it was an engaging story where an Old Hollywood star retells her life story to a young journalist. The two are connected but you don’t learn how until the end. I couldn’t put it down! Oona Out of Order was another one I would highly recommend, about a young girl who time travels to a different age of her life with every passing birthday, at random. I think I liked it because it’s a very different and creative type of story. In Five Years was for book club; here, the main character travels in time 5 years into the future for just an hour. This seems like it’ll be a love story, but it ends up being about friendship. It was cute!

Overall, time seemed to be a theme of the books I read this month. It’s also interesting because I’m so much more aware of time now, since I’ve been locked indoors all day, every day. If you can only read one book from this list, I would say Seven Husbands or Oona Out of Order; really though, you can’t go wrong with any of these books.

Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou

The Ship of Brides by Jojo Moyes

Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets & Advice for Living Your Best Life by Ali Wong
The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid
Oona Out of Order by Margarita Montimore
In Five Years by Rebecca Serle
What books did you read last month? Anything worth checking out? Feel free to send recommendations my way, I’d love to read them!
Sincerely,
Sara Ann

Books of the Month: February 2020

Another month, another three books. I decided at the start of the month to make a conscience effort to read books by Black authors for this month, all in the name of continuing to broaden my reading horizons as well as celebrating and learning more from Black voices.

New People was crazy; it has a touch of the Netflix show, You, to give some context. I found the plot to be mesmerizing, finishing the book in a matter of a day. I think it was so interesting because the main character was so blatantly flawed and possibly dealing with some mental health issues? I absolutely hate how it ended, please, if you’ve read this, can we discuss?

Queenie is about a mid-twenties woman living in London, trying to recover from heartbreak. It talks a lot about dealing mental health, focusing on yourself, and the Black Lives Matter movement. It was a really good read, especially if you’re a fan of Bridget Jones, though I felt this one touched on a bit more serious theme than Bridget’s escapades.

Finally, I read Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, and I have to say, it was very eye opening. It made me aware of how ignorant white people, including myself, can be, as well as made me better understand the privilege in whiteness that can allow one to see the violent history of the world with rose colored glasses, or rather, disregard it entirely.  It mainly discussed black history in Britain, and I’m going to be totally honest that I had no idea Britain even had a past as heavy with slaves and racism as the US. It really made me think of Chelsea Handler’s documentary, Hello Privilege. It’s Me, Chelsea, and how important it is for all people to engage (whites and blacks alike) on black history, racism, and white privilege, even if it’s uncomfortable or awkward.

I also want to include the book, An American Marriage, in this post; although, I read it a few months ago. It’s a heart wrenching story about a young black couple and how they deal with the husband’s wrongful incarceration. It very much makes you face the real horrors of how a person’s life can be ruined, something I have never much thought about as a white person.

New People by Danzy Senna

Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

Bonus: An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Overall, I’m glad I focused on Black authors this month; I learned a lot and felt that these books really challenged me to think about white privilege and to see the world through another lens. I hope more people take time to do the same, and have conversations with friends, family, etc to discuss and celebrate black history, not only in the US, but the world.

What were your reads of the month? Anything I should check out? Let me know in the comments!

Sincerely,

Sara Ann

Books of the Month: January 2020

So far I have read 5 books in the month of January, and I tried fairly hard to differentiate the selection as best I could. I was most surprised by the latest, The Friend. It was recommended to me by my hairdresser and while it’s a bit unconventional of a book, I really found it enjoyable, tackling some tough issues like love and loss. I also really loved reading, Save Me the Plums. It was an insightful book into the editorial food world and I want to try all the recipes that Ruth sprinkled throughout the book.

Royal Holiday was cute, in a Hallmark-esque movie way and Conviction was interesting, but I did find it tough to get through. I mostly liked it because the central book storyline revolved around a crime podcast, but other than that, I felt the story was a little dull. It did touch on the criticism that women receive when they come out as a victim of sexual assault, which is SO important and I’m glad they made it a point to make that a central part of the storyline as well.

Finally, I was really moved by When Breath Becomes Air, but wow, was it a heavy read. Hearing Paul’s story was heartbreaking but I would recommend reading this book at some point, when you’re in the right headspace. I did like that they tried to keep it positive, discussing his life and his impact on others, but woof, it was rough to listen to his final days, as told by his wife, Lucy.

Full list is below for anyone who needs a new read; if you can only try one, I think I would suggest Save Me the Plums; unless you’re not into food whatsoever, try reading The Friend!

Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl

Royal Holiday by Jasmine Guillory

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

Conviction by Denise Mina

The Friend by Sigrid Nunez

What are you reading now, or have you read anything great in the last few months? Feel free to suggest in the comments below. I love getting suggestions from all genres!

Best,

Sara