Books of the Month: February 2020

Another month, another three books. I decided at the start of the month to make a conscience effort to read books by Black authors for this month, all in the name of continuing to broaden my reading horizons as well as celebrating and learning more from Black voices.

New People was crazy; it has a touch of the Netflix show, You, to give some context. I found the plot to be mesmerizing, finishing the book in a matter of a day. I think it was so interesting because the main character was so blatantly flawed and possibly dealing with some mental health issues? I absolutely hate how it ended, please, if you’ve read this, can we discuss?

Queenie is about a mid-twenties woman living in London, trying to recover from heartbreak. It talks a lot about dealing mental health, focusing on yourself, and the Black Lives Matter movement. It was a really good read, especially if you’re a fan of Bridget Jones, though I felt this one touched on a bit more serious theme than Bridget’s escapades.

Finally, I read Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, and I have to say, it was very eye opening. It made me aware of how ignorant white people, including myself, can be, as well as made me better understand the privilege in whiteness that can allow one to see the violent history of the world with rose colored glasses, or rather, disregard it entirely.  It mainly discussed black history in Britain, and I’m going to be totally honest that I had no idea Britain even had a past as heavy with slaves and racism as the US. It really made me think of Chelsea Handler’s documentary, Hello Privilege. It’s Me, Chelsea, and how important it is for all people to engage (whites and blacks alike) on black history, racism, and white privilege, even if it’s uncomfortable or awkward.

I also want to include the book, An American Marriage, in this post; although, I read it a few months ago. It’s a heart wrenching story about a young black couple and how they deal with the husband’s wrongful incarceration. It very much makes you face the real horrors of how a person’s life can be ruined, something I have never much thought about as a white person.

New People by Danzy Senna

Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

Bonus: An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Overall, I’m glad I focused on Black authors this month; I learned a lot and felt that these books really challenged me to think about white privilege and to see the world through another lens. I hope more people take time to do the same, and have conversations with friends, family, etc to discuss and celebrate black history, not only in the US, but the world.

What were your reads of the month? Anything I should check out? Let me know in the comments!

Sincerely,

Sara Ann